Tony Soprano Gabagool Sandwich

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GABAGOOL

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LEARN HOW to MAKE TONY’S GABAGOOL SANDWICH

 

Instructions in SUNDAY SAUCE

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WHEN ITALIAN-AMERICANS COOK

by Daniel Bellino “Z”

 

 

 

 

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The Scorsese Family Italian Butcher

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ALBANESE MEAT MARKET 
 
Elizabeth Street ..NEW YORK  NY
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OLD SCHOOL ITALIAN BUTCHER
 
SCORSESE FAMILY BUTCHERS
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photos by Daniel Bellino Zwicke
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Catherine and Charles Scorsese


as they Appear in Son Martin Scorsese ‘s Film “ITALIAN AMERICAN”




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CATHERINE SCORSESE Making SUNDAY SAUCE ITALIAN GRAVY 

For The Shooting of ITALIAN AMERICAN




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GRANDMA BELLINO’S SICILIAN COOKBOOK

RECIPES FROM MY SICILIAN NONNA




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CHARLIE SCORSESE Making SUNDAY SAUCE GRAVY


In The Prison Scene with Paul Sorvino , Ray Liotta , and Frank Pelligrino Sr

In Martin Scorsese ‘s GOODFELLAS

Screenplay Martin Scorsese and Nick Pileggi

based on Nicholas Pileggi’s Book WISEGUY




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Catherine Scorsese with JOE PESCI   RAY LIOTTA   and ROBERT DiNERO

In MARTIN SCORSESE’S GODDFELLAS

 

“The Hoof The Hoof”


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The SCORSESE FAMILY

Marty Charlie and Catherine
In Their  ELIZABETH STREET Apartment

 

ITALIAN AMERICAN




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SUNDAY SAUCE

WHEN ITALIAN AMERICANS COOK


INSIDE




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ALBANESE BUTCHER SHOP


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The Albanese Meats and Poultry Market had its humble beginning in New York City’s famous “Little Italy” in 1923.

Started by Moe-the-Butcher’s father and mother, Vincenzo and Mariannina (Mary), the Albanese Family has been serving the very finest meats and poultry for nearly 85 years.

In a part of the city overrun with butchers, pork stores, and Italian deli’s, Albanese Meats and Poultry distinguished itself by catering to their customers and exclusively serving many of the specialty meats and holiday favorites desired by the mostly Italian immigrant community at that time.

Then in the early 50’s, Moe, after finishing college, joined the family business, as the success of the store on Elizabeth Street allowed them to expand their footprint on the Lower East Side with another store near the Williamsburg Bridge.

With his father close by his side, this is where Moe learned the trade and honed his skills as a Master Butcher- excelling in the art of skinning and butchering while formulating a keen eye for buying only the finest cuts of meat.

Then with the untimely passing of Vincenzo in 1954, the new shop was closed and Moe put aside his aspirations of attending medical school to join his mother on Elizabeth Street. He’s been there ever since.

Mary and Moe worked together on Elizabeth Street for nearly 50 years until her passing at the age of 97 in 2002. Now, Moe carries on the business and the great family tradition- serving only the finest cuts of meat with the same enjoyment and enthusiasm as the old days.







ALBANESE BUTCHER SHOP
 
The MOVIE
 
 
 
 
 

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MOE THE BUTCHER
 
 
ALBANESE BUTCHER SHOP
 
 
ELIZABETH STREET
 
NEW YORK NY
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Inside the Butcher Shop
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Fresh Turkeys for Thanksgiving
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LITTLE ITALY TOUR
 
 
VINNIE VELLA
 
 
The Un-OFFICIAL MAYOR of ELIZABETH STREET
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THE RAGU BOLOGNESE COOKBOOK
 
by DANNY BOLOGNESE
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PICTURE of SINATRA
 
with TONY
 
owner of The Marechiare Bar
 
aka TONY’S NUTHOUSE
 
on MULBERRY STREET
 
Now it’s The MULBERRY STREET BAR
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Joe Macari Mallmann Feast at Macari Vineyards

 

JOE MACARI KNOWS HOW to THROW a GREAT PARTY!

 
 
PIG ROASTING at JOE MACARI’S MALLMANN DINNER – FEAST
 
 
 
 
 
CLAUDIO Tends The Fire Pit at MACARI MALLMAN FEAST
 
 
 
Roast Goat, Roast Lamb , Pineapples , and Chicken
 
 
Cooking on FRANCIS MALLMAN STYLE Fire Pit
 
 
As “HEY JOE” by The Late Great JIMI HENDRIX Plays
 
 
JIMI HENDRIX
 
“My Cousin Eddies Girlfriend was Channeling
JIMI with Her HENDRIX Style Jacket”
 
Sorry I Don’t Have a Picture
 
Yes JIMI HENDRIX Was playing JOE’S sound system,
 
lots of Great Music : R&B ROCK N ROLL
 
The ROLLING STONES , The BEATLES
 
and Thank God No Crap HIP HOP RAP at All !!!
 
 
 
 
 

JOE MACARI ‘ S MALLMAN STYLE FEAST 
 
at MACARI VINEYARDS
 
Watch The Video
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FRIENDS !!!
 
L to R :
 
James Bibieri
 
Host of The Party JOE MACARI Jr.
 
with Cousin Daniel Bellino “Z”
 
 
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The PIG ROAST
 
Watch The Video
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Dave Martinez
 
The PIG ROAST MASTER
 
and FRIEND
 
MANS THE SPIT
 
 
Me and my Buddy, renowned Actor James Biberi Chat with our friend 
Dave Martinez The Pit Master … Dave kindly offers us a nip of his 
JOHNNIE WALKER BLUE LABEL SCOTCH.
 
 
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Johnnie Walker Blue
 
 
“DAM THAT SCOTCH Was AWESOME” !!!
 
I’m not normally a SCOTH Drinker.
 
BUT My Buddy JIMMY “B” and I Really Enjoyed That One.
 
“Thanks Dave”
 
 
 
 
 
The PIG
 
“DAM THAT SUCKER Was GOOD”
 
 
BEST ROAST PORK EVER !!!
 
 
A Small Piece of The Vineyards
 
 
 
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CUGINI e AMICI
 
Cousins & Friends at Joe Macari’s Mallmann Feast
 
 
Front Row L to R : Anthony Bellino , Daniel Bellino “Z”
 
and Host Joe Macari Jr.
 
Back Row : James Biberi and our Friend LOU
 
 
 
 
 
Cousins Anthony Bellino
 
and Author Daniel Bellino “Z”
 
with a Methusaleh
 
of FONTALLORO 2000
 
 
 
We also Drank This Wonderful Bottle
 
a Magnum of CANNUBI BAROLO 1999
 
produced by MARCHESE di BAROLO
 
Courtesy of Joe Macari
 
as well as RUINART
 
and Lots of Other Goodies
 
“Thanks Joe”
 
 
 
 
 
THUMBS UP For a GREAT PARTY
 
 
GABRIELLA MACARI
 
 
 
 
 
THERE WAS PIZZA TOO !!!
 
 
From EDDIE MACARI’S PIZZA TRUCK
 
 
AVELINO PIZZA at MACARI VINEUYARDS
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PIZZA MARGHERITA
by Eddie Macari
AVELINO PIZZA
Mattituck , New York
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Winery at MACARI VINEYARDS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The RED BARN
 
 
 
 
 
 
CAB FRANC
 
 
Macari Vineyards
 
 
 
 
 
 
An Awesome Vat of MALBEC
 
Aging in MACARI VINETARDS WINE CELLARS
 
Vintage 2015
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The RAGU BOLOGNESE COOKBOOK
SECRET BOLOGNESE RECIPE
by Danny Bolognese
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Espresso

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ESPRESSO


Espresso, the making, consuming and enjoyment of a properly made Espresso is another facet and time honored tradition of Italian-Americans and their culture. We do love our properly pulled Espresso. A properly pulled Espresso is a thing of
beauty and refinement, and must be done just so. We can and do make Espresso in
our homes with either a Neapolitan or Moka brewing device, and now these days, there are any number of expensive new-fangled home espresso makers, more on that later.
Some might be surprised but the great art of the perfect Italian Espresso has been around for just about 110 years. Yes Italians drank Espresso before that, but
it was only developed into a “Fine Art” that it is today, just a little more
then a hundred years ago or so when Luigi Bezzera developed the first Espresso
Machine that we know today. After this landmark in Espresso history, the
consumption and popularity of Espresso grew rapidly. Caffes and Espresso Bars
popped up everywhere all over Italy. These Espresso Bars were places to have an
Espresso and socialize. And in Italy, there is a whole act and ritual to going
to an Espresso Bar for your habitual morning coffee. And it’s not just for the
Espresso but some socializing, a bit of chit-chat, gossip, political talk,
sports (Soccer/Futbol), this-that-and-every-other-thing. This morning Espresso
is quite ritualistic in Italy, and is practiced by most, and in every corner of
the country, on every other street corner in cities like; Rome, Bologna, Palermo,
Milano, Verona, all over. And it is quite the sight to see, especially if
you’re an American going for the first time. In caffes and bars in Italy it is
at the stand-up Espresso bar where all the action takes place. When you go into
a caffe (a.k.a. Bar) in Italy and have a Espresso, Cappuccino, whatever, and
sit at a table, that Espresso will cost you an additional 50% or more than it
will if you consume it standing up at the counter at the Espresso Bar. It’s a
tax thing. The caffe owners are taxed on their tables and this tax gets passed
on to the customer. Basta!
Anyway, the ritual of the early morning Italian Espresso? People get dressed, leave their homes and are on their way to work, but they don’t go right from their
house to their job. No they have to have an Espresso and the ritual of the
Espresso and some Chit-Chat (BS) with a quick stop at their favorite local
caffe. They might leave their house then go to an Espresso Bar near their home
before going to their job, or they may head to their job, then get an Espresso
at a favored caffe near the work-place. They might even do both, get an
Espresso in their neighborhood before heading to work, then stopping at an Espresso Bar close to their workplace before bopping into work.
     Well, that’s the way they do it in Italy, quite a ritual and amazing to see. In America, Italian immigrants to cities like New York, Boston, Providence, and Philadelphia opened Social Clubs that served Espresso, maybe some sandwiches, soup, soda, Biscotti, and Anisette Toast, and Cannoli that they bought from a nearby baker. These Social Clubs which sprung up in neighborhoods like the Lower East Side of New York or what is now called Little Italy, in Boston’s North End, and San Francisco’s North Beach. These Social Clubs (Caffe) were primarily of and for the working class, and were for Italians. The clubs were for Italians, and people of other nationalities did not go into them unless they were brought in by an Italian
guy from the neighborhood. And that’s the way it was back then.

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 Espresso e Dolce at home? When I was growing up and went to my Aunt Fran and Uncle Tony’s house in Lodi, or to Aunt Helen’s for Sunday Dinner, and we ate our
meal, and it moved on to coffee and dessert, this was quite a sight that brings
back nice memories for me to this very day. And it was a wonderful ritual, and
unlike the quick grab your Espresso, Chit-Chat for a few minutes and run out
the door as is done at caffe’s and Espresso Bars in Italy, the Espresso was
anything but Espresso (Fast) at Bellino Family meals, as is with millions of
Italian-American families over the years. No, this was no quick hit-and-run
affair. The coffee and dessert course at our family gatherings was the longest
portion of our all day affair of the Sunday Meal. My Aunts and Uncles would sit
around the table, we (the Kids) would too, but we would go back and forth,
cause this sit-down at the table usually lasted about 3 hours, maybe more. We’d
sit down, and Aunt Fran and Aunt Helen had the Neapolitan going with Espresso.
The table was laden with all sorts of goodies; Cannolis of course, one or two
different cakes, and an assortment of Italian Cookies and Pastries (Sfogiatelle, Mille Foglie). There was always enough to fill Pastry Shop Showcase, “I kid you not!”
The table full of my aunts and uncles was a wonder. They’d sit around drinking
coffee, eating pastries, and talk-talk-talk, about politics, sports, gossip,
this-that-and-everything. My uncle Frank who was the Ring-Leader could have
solved all the Worlds problems, right there at that table, filled with Cannoli,
Biscotti, Coffee (Espresso), cakes, Anisette, heated discussion, laughter, and
a “Bundle of Joy,” all over Espresso.
Aunt Helen and Aunt Fran made the Espresso in Neapolitan Espresso Maker. The Neapolitan is from Napoli, Italy. It was developed so Neapolitans (and all
Italians) could make Espresso in their homes. The Neapolitan is a two-piece
device whereby, you fill the bottom of the vessel with water, the ground
espresso goes in the middle and you screw on the empty top. To make Espresso
with the Neapolitan you put the device on the stove over a flame with the piece
filled with the water on the stove. The water heats, and when it comes to the
boil, you turn the flame off, flip the vessel over so the hot water is at the
top and will then drip down through the ground coffee to make the Espresso. The
Espresso is not as good as that you’d get at a caffe or Espresso Bar with a
large machine, but it’s good enough, and adding a little shot of Anisette is
never a bad thing, something my Uncle Frank always did. This is called a Caffe
Corretto, the act of adding a few drops of your desire liquor into your
espresso. You can add; Grappa, Sambucca, Brandy, Anisette, or other liquor to
make a caffe corretto. At Aunt Fran & Unlce Tony’s, it was always Anisette.
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Basta.





  
 
My NAPOLITAN
 
I Bought in NAPOLI 1987
 

As a child it was always something to see, watching Aunt Fran or Aunt Helen go
through the pleasant little ritual of making Espresso in that curious looking
contraption, the Neapolitan. As I said, it always intrigued me, and when I took
my first trip to Italy and was in Napoli walking through a street market and
spotted a merchant selling Neapolitans and other kitchenware’s, I just had to get myself one, a Neapolitan of my own and from the great city it was invented in, Napoli. I also brought back some beautiful ceramic plates from nearby Vietro sul Mare on the nearby Amalfi coast, and I’ve been making Espresso with my Neapolitan (bought in Napoli), and eating Spaghetti on those beautiful Amalfi Coast Plates from ever since, a joy, and a way to bring Italy into your own American home. Doing so, brings back beautiful memories of; Positano, The Amalfi Coast, Sicily, and the rest of Italy. If you can’t be there (which is a shame), then bring Italy into your home. And that is what we do, every time we sit down to a meal, a glass of wine, or a simple little cup of Espresso, “we bring Italy home.”




ESPRESSO is Excerpted from Daniel Bellino-Zwicke ‘s  SUNDAY SAUCE
SUNDAY SAUCE  – When Italian-Americans Cook is Available in Paperback
& Kindle on Amazon.com
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SUNDAY SAUCE
 
When Italian-Americans Cook
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Cannolis Were Always on The Table
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And a Bottle of Anisette
 
 
 
 
 
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SECRET ITALIAN RECIPES
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SEGRETO ITALIANO
by Daniel Bellino “Z”
aka
DANNY BOLOGNESE
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A MOKA POT
For Making Espresso
 
 
 
 
Toto & Peppino 
with a NAPOLITAN
in
The BAND of HONEST MEN 1956
 
 
 
 
 
 
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New York Italian Fried Steaks

 

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BISTECCHE PALMERTIANO

 
Steak al Palermo

 
This Steak preparation from Palermo is the favorite way that Palermitani like to eat Steak when they are eating it, which is not all that often. Well not all that often 50 years ago or more when most of the population was quite poor. These days however, it’s a much different story, people have a little more money these days, and can afford a steak dinner every now and then. Though in the past few years with the world’s economy in a downturn, maybe they can’t afford steaks all that much once again. This is one reason that the cut of steak is usually cut from the rump or other cheaper cut of beef. In the recipe here however, we have you using Sirloin Steak, though more expensive, it’s tastier and more forgiving when cooking it. It will be tender, and not tough as a Rump Steak would be. The dish is almost like a Veal Milanese, a famed Northern Italian dish, Veal Milanese which is quite expensive. Besides it being marinated and that it’s beef instead of veal, though similar, the Steak Palmertiano is quite different than it’s much more expensive northern cousin.

Being in the Provencia di Palermo in Lercara Friddi, this dish was known to my Sicilian grandfather, who was so poor he only ate it a few times in his life. In America he could have it a bit more often, which was just once a year, cooked by his wife Giuseppina for Philipo’s Birthday as a special birthday treat. Make it and treat yourself as well every-now-and-then.
RECIPE :

4 Sirloin Steaks, cut 1/3 of an inch thick

¼ cup Olive Oil, the Juice of 1 Lemon

3 cloves Garlic, peeled and sliced thin

1 bay Leaf

¼ cup chopped fresh Parsley

¼ teaspoon dry Sicilian Oregano

6 tablespoons red wine

1 cup Breadcrumbs

1 Lemon, cut in quarters

Get your butcher to cut you 4 Sirloin Steaks at a thickness of ¾ of an inch each, and have him pound the steaks flat.

Place olive oil, garlic, Lemon Juice, Oregano, wine, and half the fresh Parsley in a shallow glass baking dish and mix all together. 



Place the steaks in the marinade and let marinate for at least 3 or hours or overnight.

After the steaks have marinated, remove from marinade and shake off excess.

Coat steaks with breadcrumbs on both sides.






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Put 8 tablespoons vegetable oil in a large frying pan that is big enough to cook two teaks at a time. Heat oil to high and add two of the steaks. Cook the steaks over medium-high heat for about 3 minutes. 



Turn steaks over and cook on second side for three minutes. Remove the two cooked steaks and place in a 200 degree oven on a plate or pan to keep warm.

Cook the other two steaks the same as the first two. When all four steaks are cooked, plate onto 4 plates and sprinkle on the remaining Parsley over the steaks.

Garnish each plate with a lemon wedge and serve steaks with a Mixed Green Salad, Potatoes, or whichever vegetable you like.

This Recipe was Excerpted from GRANDMA BELLINO’S ITALIAN COOKBOOK by Daniel Bellino Z – Reicpes from My Sicilian Nonna  …

 

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SICILIAN FRIED STEAKS
alla PALERMITANA
 
 
 
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GRANDMA BELLINO’S
ITALIAN COOKBOOK
 
SICILIAN & Other Italian Recipes
 
by Daniel Bellino Z
 
 
 
 
 
 
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MAKE EXTRA FRIED STEAKS
 
to Make STEAK SANDWICHES For LUNCH the Next Day
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MANGIA BENE SEMPRE
 
 
 
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New York Pizza

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NEW YORK PIZZA
 
 
 
The most common and now quintessential form of NY pizza has thus become the type that is cooked in gas ovens rather than the Neapolitan-American type cooked with coal. NY style pizza is sold either as whole pies or by the “slice” — a triangular wedge cut from a whole pizza. Typically, an 18″ NY pizza yields eight slices. With the exception of Patsy’s, none of the original coal oven pizzerias sell pizza by the slice. The availability of slices of pizza fundamentally changed the nature of pizza in NYC, liberating it from the restaurant and substantially lowering the financial barrier of entry. NY style is virtually defined by the low cost of entry, the immediacy of service, and the portability of the product.The NY style pizzas tend to have far more cheese than Neapolitan-American coal oven pies. The cheese typically covers the entire pie, with sauce only poking out along the circumference. A low moisture mozzarella is used rather than fresh mozzarella, which is not well suited to the lower temperature and longer cooking times of the gas ovens. Gas fired pizza lacks the sooty exterior that is a hallmark of coal fired ovens, but it still has plenty of crunch and snap to go along with the pliancy and springiness of the dough.









 
 
The Original JOE’S PIZZERIA
Corner of CARMINE & BLEECKER STREET
Has Moved a few Doors Up to 71 CARMINE STREET
in GREENWICH VILLAGE
The QUINTESSENTIAL NEW YORK SLICE
at JOES
MANY CONSIDER JOE’S The BEST SLICE in NEW YORK
For GAS FIRED PIZZA
“I Beg to DIFFER” 
“PLEASE !!!” 
   
For ME
It’s The Pizza Master Mr. Dominic DeMarco
 
of DiFARA PIZZA
 
Brooklyn, NEW YORK
 
 
 
 
The MASTER HIMSELF
 
Mr. DOMINIC DeMARCO
 
DiFARA PIZZA
 
 
  
The MAESTRO at Work
 
Another Perfectly Crafted PIZZA PIE
 
by Mr. Dom DeMARCO
 
DiFRA PIZZA
photo Copyright DANIEL BELLINO ZWICKE
BROOKLYN , NEW YORK






The Classic SICILIAN SQUARE
In addition to the classic round pizza, most every pizzeria also sells Sicilian style pies and slices. Characterized by a rectangular shape due to being pan cooked, with a crust that is generally over an inch thick, this style of pizza originated in the bakeries, not the pizzerias, of Sicily, where it is sold as Sfincgioni. In Sicily, Sfinciuni is topped with a tomato sauce spiked with anchovies and onions under a canopy of breadcrumbs rather than the tomato sauce and cheese we see in NYC. That latter recipe is the result of the American melting pot effect of throwing Neapolitans and Sicilians together into lower Manhattan. You can find a version of Sfinciuni sold at Prince Street Pizza as the Broadway Breadcrumb and also at Famous Ben’s as the Palermo slice. Some of NYC’s most storied pizzerias specialize in square slices like L & B Spumoni Gardens in Brooklyn and Rizzo’s in Astoria, Queens.
 
 
 
L&B SPUMONI GARDENS
the UNDISPUTED CHAMP of THE SICILIAN SQUARE
BROOKLYN, NEW YORK
 
 
 
And DON”T Forget to Get the Namesake Dessert
SPUMONI
  
The BIGGEST QUESTION of ALL
 
 
WHO MAKES NEW YORK’S BEST PIZZA ???
 
 
 
 
 
LOMBARDI’S
 
 
AMERICA’S First PIZZA
LOMBARDI’S is the ROOT of ALL GREAT PIZZA In AMERICA
GENARO LOMARDI With PIZZAIOLO ANTHONY PERO (Totonno’s)
Lombardi’s thrived in Little Italy, feeding legions of factory workers and immigrants longing for a taste of home. It was so popular that Lombardi soon dispensed with the groceries entirely and started selling pizza exclusively. Numerous employees struck out on their own, fanning out across the city and spreading the distinctive style of pizza.








  
TOTONNO PIZZERIA NAPOLITANO
Neptune Avenue
BROOKLYN , NEW YORK
Since 1927
 
 
According to the owners of Totonno’s Pizza, sisters Cookie Cimineri and Antoinette Balzano will not tolerate anyone telling them someone besides their grandfather Anthony “Totonno” Pero brought pizza to America. They don’t want any money, so much so that if you disagree, they’ll probably kick you out before you can order.
A BRIEF HISTORY of NEW YORK PIZZA
In 1924, Lombardi’s employee Anthony “Totonno” Pero opened Totonno’s in Coney Island. Five years later, John Sasso, also an employee of Lombardi’s, opened John’s Pizza on Bleecker Street. 1933 saw Pasquale “Patsy” Lanceri, reputed to have been a Lombardi’s employee, open Patsy’s in Harlem. Lombardi’s, John’s, Totonno’s, and Patsy’s are all still around today and represent cornerstones of the original NY style of pizza. (Lombardi’s closed in 1984 and reopened a decade later in a different space on the same block.)
1905: Gennaro Lombardi’s opens America’s “First Ever Pizzeria” at  53 1/2 Spring St. in Lower Manhattam, New York, NY .. Some famed Pizzaioli  (Pizza Makers) work there over the years;Anthony Pero founder of Totonno’s Coney Island, John Sasso of John’s Pizza Bleecker Street, and Pasquale Lancieri aka “Patsy” who opens “Patsy’s Pizzeria in Eats Harlem. A Pizza cost a Nickel at Lombardi’s in 1905 ..1924: Anthony “Totonno” Pero opens Totonno’s in Coney Island. Establishes unusual ritual that some Pizzerias carry on to this day. When the dough runs out, the Pizzeria close for the day.



1929: John Sasso opens John’s Pizzeria on Bleecker Street.
1933: Pasquale “Patsy” Lancieri opens Patsy’s in East Harlem.
1956: Average cost of a slice of New York pizza: 15 cents. Price keeps pace with cost of subway fare, seen as a kind of an economic indicator.



1959: Ralph Cuomo opens Ray’s Pizza on Prince Street.
1964: Di Fara Pizza opens in Midwood, Brooklyn.
1977: Saturday Night Fever: John Travolta double-slices it at Lenny’s in Bay Ridge.



1990: ThreeRay’s owners, none of them named Ray, band together, form a coalition to trademark the name, and eliminate impostors, or make them pay a fee.



1994: Seventy-nine people are arrested for operating an international drug ring out of a midtown Famous Original Ray’s.



2004: Anthony Mangieri opens Una Pizza Napoletana. Some call him “The Pizza Nazi” 



2004: Zagat awards Di Fara 28 rating for food along with Le Bernardin and Jean Georges;     Di Fara also receives lowest rating ever for décor: 5.















 
SUNDAY SAUCE
 
No PIZZA HERE !
 
JUST LOTS of OTHER GREAT RECIPES
 
by Daniel Bellino “Z”
 
 
 
 
.
 
GET THE SECRET RECIPE !!!
 
 
 
 
.
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The RAGU BOLOGNESE COOKBOOK
SECRET RECIPE
by DANNY BOLOGNESE
 
 
 
 
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Neapolitan Pizza Macari Wine and Music

 Are a WINNING COMBINATION

at MACARI VINEYARDS

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The State of The Art Pizza Truck
 
AVELINO PIZZA
 
by Edward Macari
 
At MACARI VINEYARDS
 
Mattituck, New York

PIZZA & MACARI WINE

GREAT MUSIC TOO 

 “NO HIP HOP”

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EDDIE MACARI
 
MAKING a PIZZA MARGHERITA
 
at AVELINO PIZZA
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   Yes Great Music , Pizza , and North Fork Wine are a Winning Combination at Macari Vineyards in Mattituck, New York .. Young Edward Macari is taking charge at his new establishment AVELINO PIZZA at Macari Vineyards on The North Fork of Long Island. 
Eddie Macari is manning the Wood Burning Pizza Oven of his Custom Made Pizza Truck. Well it’s really a trailer, but we’ll call it a truck. It rolls off the tongue a bit easier than trailer, as does Eddies Classic Neapolitan Pizza that has been getting some rave reviews ever since it opened just a few short weeks ago. Edward Macari, better known as Eddie may be young but he’s been honing his skills for quite some time, starting as a young boy at his family’s vineyard on The North Fork of Long Island ..  Edward honed both wine and food related proficiency, not to mention life-skills at Macari Vineyards. Along with working at Macari Vineyards from an early age, as well as at some of New York’s hottest restaurants, Edward is a graduate of The Italian Culinary Experience at the International Culinary Center and The Institute of Culinary Education in New York.
Yes we had quite a nice time on our recent visit to Macari Vineyards and Avelino Pizza. We arrived at the winery and made our way to the Macari Tasting Room where we tried some fine North Fork Wine. Our guided tour through a flight of Macari’s most popular wines of Sauvignon Blanc, Rose, Cabernet Franc, and a wine called Dos Aguas was most enjoyable, and informative to boot. They told us we could buy some wine by the bottle and go outside and enjoy. Our tasting guide told us that they had recently opened a Pizzeria on the premises and that they made some great Pizza that would go well with our wine. It sounded like a plan to me, so we bought a couple bottles of wine (Chardonnay and Cabernet Franc) and made our way to the Pizza Truck. We looked over the menu and decided on a classic Pizza Margherita and the Special Pizza of the day, Butternut Squash with Wild Mushrooms and Mozzarella. It took just a few minutes for the Pizza Guys (Eddie & Mike) to make our Pizzas and we were all set. So we sat back, sipped our wine, and devoured our pies. Wow, it may sound Cliche to say, but I’ll say it, “It doesn’t get much better than this.” They were playing some great R&B and ROCK – N – ROLL music mixed in with Louis Prima and Mr. Frank Sinatra, making for a most pleasant atmosphere . We drank our wine and ate that tasty Pizza. Quite an experience, and one I highly recommend.
So if you’re looking for something special one day, head out to The North Fork of Long Island to Avelino Pizza at Macari Vineyards, go inside to Macari ‘s tasting room, take a Wine Tasting at the bar and see which of the Macari Wines you like best. Grab yourself a bottle, get a table outside before heading to the Avelino Pizza Truck and let Eddie and Mike make you a Classic Neapolitan Pizza .. Get your pie, sit down, sip some wine, eat your Pizza and listened to the sounds of Sinatra, Marvin Gaye, Louis Prima, The Rolling Stones, and whoever, and “All will be fine in your World.” Enjoy the experience, Great Music, Pizza, and Macari Wine.
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Basta !!!
by Daniel Bellino-Zwicke
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PIZZA DIAVOLA
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PIZZA MARGHERITA
 
 
AVELINO PIZZA
SPECIAL PIZZA of THE DAY
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Butternut Squash with Wild Mushrooms and Mozzarella
“Yummy” !!!
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AVELINO PIZZA at MACARI VINETARDS
Left to Right :  Author Daniel Bellino-Zwicke  , Pizzaiolo Edward Macari
Thomas Macari and President of Macari Vineyards Joseph Macari Jr.
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Edward Macari studied Italian Culinary Techniques in Parma, Italy. He also has experience cooking in Italy when he did a stint with acclaimed Chef Massimo Spigaroli         “The Master of Culatello di Zibello”  at Antica Corte Pallavicina Restorante in Emilia Romagna outside of of Parma. Edward Macari also attended the Accademia della Pizza Napoletana in California and has immersed himself in the World of Pizza and Italian Cuisine at home and in Italy before returning home to the North Fork at Avelino Pizza.
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ESPRESSO Too !!!

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Joseph M. Macari : Vineyard Manager MACARI VINEYARDS

with Sister GABRIELLA MACARI : Director of PR & Marketing MACARI VINEYARDS

with Cousin Danny

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ALEXANDRA MACARI

Managing Director MACARI VINEYARDS

Mother of Edward

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MACARI VINEYARDS

Mattituk , New York

on The NORTH FORK

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